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Updated: 12 hours 24 min ago

Exclusive: Listen to two tracks from Mike Brody album Sell Me A Bridge, out Oct. 27

Tue, 10/17/2017 - 15:08

When NBA star forward Kevin Love left the Timberwolves to join LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers, stand-up comedian Mike Brody – like most sports fans in Minnesota – was all sorts of bummed. But Brody turned his pain into comedy and his comedy into nearly three million views on YouTube with “Kevin Love Jersey Burning – Minnesota Nice Style,” a video poking fun at those who think defiling store-bought sportswear is a bold protest while simultaneously having a laugh at his Midwestern roots. It’s hilarious and, actually, kind of sweet.

Three years later Brody’s head is in a different place, not that he’s above light-hearted goofs. But as he prepares for the release of a new stand-up album Sell Me A Bridge (Oct. 27 on Rooftop/Audible) Brody is reveling in the newfound freedom he feels from writing much more personal material. “I think I got to a point in my career where I realized that I wasn’t really being me on stage,” Brody tells Laughspin. “I was down in the dumps and stalling creatively. Plus, my best friend, comedian Bill Young, had died and it sent me into a tailspin. I had a career and I was funny. But I wasn’t sharing anything about me as a person and I made a conscious decision to change that immediately.”

With that in mind, Laughspin is psyched to exclusively premiere two tracks from Sell Me A Bridge, which you can ear-peep below. Also below: A complete track listing plus more from Brody on the making of the album. Enjoy!

PRE-ORDER MIKE BRODY’S ALBUM ‘SELL ME A BRIDGE’

Sell Me A Bridge – Complete Track Listing

1. Fat Again
2. Reality Check
3. Grief Porn
4. Sobriety is a Tricky Thing
5. Sell Me a Bridge
6. Adult Child
7. Mike Brody Goes West
8. Moment of Truth
9. A Tale of Two Dachshunds
10. Pet of the Week
11. Look at Me!
12. Tell Everybody!
13. Cat Attack

ON WRITING NEW MATERIAL
I recorded this album in mid-August and every joke except one was written since January 2017. I just gave myself a deadline and stuck to it and I ended up writing my favorite material ever, because it’s all me.

ON GETTING PERSONAL
In the past, I really had a hard time talking about sobriety and things like that on stage. Any time I’d start, someone would yell out ‘Quitter!’ or something shitty. I don’t get stage fright anymore, but if an audience doesn’t like a joke about a sandwich, it’s no big deal. If they don’t like your joke about your personal struggle with sobriety that you’ve fought for over a decade, it hurts. It’s YOU.

ON THE TONE OF ‘SELL ME A BRIDGE’
The album is dark in places and light in others, just like life. It’s incredibly personal, talking about struggles with weight, suicidal thoughts and moments in my life when I felt trapped and depressed with no way out. But at the end of the day I’m an optimist, and I got through it all. And I wanted this album to reflect that life can be dark with twists and turns, but there’s always a light at the end of the tunnel. And I dedicated the album to the memory of Bill Young, because the tragedy of his death was the beginning of all this for me.

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Julian McCullough headlines fundraising event to ‘stand up’ against mental health stigma (guest post)

Thu, 09/07/2017 - 13:03

Storytelling is a powerful agent for change. Sharing personal stories with others takes bravery, especially when a person is opening up about their own mental health journey. In doing so, they may feel vulnerable or judged. And while those feelings may exist because of the dark shadow stigma casts on mental health, something far more important and impactful is happening; people are learning, relating—empathizing. Stigma is replaced with a message of hope.

The individuals listening may be going through similar issues, and therefore the storytelling is helping others feel like they are not alone. Sharing mental health stories is combatting stigma. These stories of lived-experience are relatable and genuinely felt. They are not forced, staged, or mechanical. They are truths being told based on that person’s life.

Similarly, comedy that resonates with an audience is also storytelling at its finest. Human life as told through the eyes of a comedian has a very unique appeal. Good stand-up comedy wouldn’t exist without comedians willingly stepping outside of their comfort zone to share their personal stories. It can even be therapeutic for the comedians and audience members. The very events a comedian shares on stage may be similar to the experience of an audience member, giving them both an opportunity to laugh and find humor in life’s situations.

On Monday, September 18, 2017 at 8pm, comedian, actor, and writer Julian McCullough will bring you comedic storytelling at its best. He will team up with the Jordan Porco Foundation charity for a night of stand-up comedy to stand up against mental health stigma at the Comedy Cellar at the Village Underground. All proceeds — TICKETS HERE — will benefit the mental health promotion and suicide prevention programs of the Jordan Porco Foundation.

“When celebrities like Julian use their influence in support of raising mental health awareness, it makes them key allies for challenging stigma, wherever it may be. With comedy, Julian has found ways to broach tough topics, providing what many cannot—a sense of relief and laughter,” said Marisa Giarnella-Porco, President and CEO of the Jordan Porco Foundation.

Relief from stigma is needed. Research on stigma towards mental illness shows that most people, starting at a young age, hold negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. These attitudes include stereotypes and perceptions that those with mental illness are dangerous to others. According to the World Health Organization, depression alone is the leading cause of disability in the world. One in four American adults is suffering from a mental health disorder this year. But, even though this crisis is so visible in our society, only 25% of those diagnosed with mental illness feel that other people are caring and sympathetic towards individuals with mental illness.1 Stigma can create overwhelming feelings of isolation and shame that cause people with mental health issues to distance themselves from their family and friends, due to fear of being judged.

“I don’t want my daughter to feel alone, to distance herself from the people she loves. My daughter’s mental health is important to me because I don’t want her to simply endure life, I want her to enjoy it. I want her to be able to talk about how she is feeling without fear being judged. I want her to freely share her talents with the world, know how to take care of herself, and how to take care of the people she loves… especially me when I get old,” said Julian.

Sharing our stories helps bring people together, replacing fear with hope. It takes a village to stand up against mental health stigma and change the mental health landscape. Come be part of our village at the Comedy Cellar at the Village Underground. Get your tickets, here. Tickets are $80 per person. Doors open at 7:15pm for the 8pm show. 21 and older.

About the Jordan Porco Foundation

The Jordan Porco Foundation’s mission is to prevent suicide, promote mental health, and create a message of hope for young adults. This is accomplished by providing engaging and uplifting peer-run programs on college campuses. Their programs strive to start a conversation about mental health that reduces stigma while encouraging help-seeking and supportive behaviors in order to save young adult lives. Learn more at jordanporcofoundation.org.

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